Derek Hyra is an associate professor in the School of Public Affairs and Founding Director of the Metropolitan Policy Center at American University. His research focuses on processes of neighborhood change, with an emphasis on housing, urban politics, and race. He is a leading expert on gentrification and equitable neighborhood development policy.

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Voice Of America's

New Urban Renewal

One of the most respected researchers on gentrification and the New Urban Renewal, Derek Hyra offers an unparalleled analysis of the nation's most difficult and complex issues.

BOOKS

The phrase “cappuccino city” refers to previously low-income, minority neighborhoods that are experiencing major demographic shifts caused by the influx of mid-to-upper income, white millennials. It’s happening in the Bronx in New York City, in Chicago’s Bronzeville neighborhood, and in the Shaw area of Washington, D.C. Shaw is the neighborhood at the center of Derek Hyra’s new book, “Race, Class, and Politics in the Cappuccino City.”

THE NEW URBAN RENEWAL

CAPITAL DILEMMA

RACE, CLASS, AND POLITICS IN THE CAPPUCCINO CITY

IN THE MEDIA

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WAMU

September 11, 2019

"Derek Hyra, an American University professor who studies neighborhood change, wrote about the complex issues around dog parks. He notes the Chevy Chase fight wasn’t about the usual debates — resources or new people moving in — it was about who had more political power. But that’s not usually the case, he said. Hyra says when communities debate amenities, such as dog parks, it can get contentious. 'It’s not so much about the pet, or the park, it’s about who controls space in a community. And I think that dog parks and different public amenities really symbolize and represent who does and who does not have the power in particular communities.'"

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Washington City Paper

August 29, 2019

"As crime rates began to decrease in the ’90s and early 2000s, groups such as Cultural Tourism DC began what Hyra calls “black branding” with offerings such as the African American Heritage Trail. WMATA began selling properties near Metro stations that were redeveloped into high-end residential properties such as the Ellington apartments, named after African American jazz composer Duke Ellington, at 1301 U Street NW. The proliferation of jobs throughout the D.C. region after the recession prompted white millennials, who had already begun entering the city in years prior, to come in droves, according to Hyra’s research."

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Bisnow Dallas-Fort Worth

June 3, 2019

“Housing unaffordability used to be limited to places like New York and Washington, D.C., but is now hitting other U.S. markets, said Derek Hyra, an associate professor with the School of Public Affairs at American University who has been studying gentrification nationwide."

JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS

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