IN THE MEDIA

Derek often provides provocative commentary in mainstream media outlets on housing and economic development challenges in urban American.

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ABC News

March 24, 2022

“What we've seen is there's been a real movement in the last ten years of gentrification coming to southern cities," Hyra said. "So it went from D.C. to Durham to Atlanta. We see Nashville has had a huge wave of gentrification, and we see that it's moving further south. So a place like Memphis is likely going to be a place where gentrification occurs.”

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The Washington Post

March 23, 2022

“If you’re going to have someone on the progressive side to challenge Bowser, you’re going to have to consolidate the constituencies that Trayon and Robert have,” Hyra said. “If you split that progressive vote, it makes it even more difficult to go up against Bowser, who has such a good ground game.”

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The Atlanta Black Star

January 20, 2022

“Hyra expects high-price developers to target low-income communities of color across the more aggressively as the country emerges from the pandemic due to rising property values. “It’s just scratching the surface of what’s happening on the ground in a lot of low-income communities of color,” Hyra said of the looming problem facing Black and brown communities.”

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America Magazine

November 1, 2021

“Now the country is changing again. Urban neighborhoods have once again become more attractive in many cities. “There’s traffic in the suburbs, and millennials don’t want to drive to work,” said Derek Hyra, a professor of public administration and policy at American University in Washington, D.C. “We’re starting to look more like European cities, like Lyon and Paris, where poverty is being pushed into the ring of neighborhoods surrounding cities.”

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WAMU 88.5

September 10, 2021

“Many of those private sector technology companies have government contracts — and this spending didn’t just lead to an influx of new, wealthier, residents in Virginia. It also led newcomers, many of them white, to historically Black D.C. neighborhoods, according to American University Professor Derek Hyra.”

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Jetset Times

September 3, 2021

“Hyra notes that even though Washington, D.C. has affordable housing policies that keep people in place, there is still a sense of loss amongst the community because of new amenities coming in, or because of the political dynamic shifting for the newcomers. In Hyra’s words, “Just because this neighborhood is redeveloping, and people think this is a wonderful thing, long-term residents can’t even utilize the amenities because it is beyond their price points.”

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Bloomberg

July 30, 2021

“Still, the trend of institutional investors buying single-family homes and multifamily units for renting can be expected to increase and become more of a political issue as long as the market remains hot, according to Derek Hyra, a professor and founding director of the Metropolitan Policy Center at American University who’s studying the impact of the pandemic on the real estate market. And there’s no denying it’s one of the factors affecting the market and communities, he said.”

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The Washington Post

July 1, 2021

““There would be less emotional reaction to dog parks if other amenities, like affordable housing, were coming at the same time,” Hyra said. “When people see a dog park come in, it’s just another signal they’re not wanted in the city.””

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The Washington Post

February 18, 2021

“The affordable crisis didn’t happen because of Amazon,” Hyra says. But the amount promised, he adds, “is a drop in the bucket of the affordable housing needs of the area.” Those needs will greatly intensify as Amazon’s highly paid workers flood into the area, and they will be felt most acutely by those with the lowest incomes."

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The New York Times

January 10, 2021

"Whether statehood might follow seems a long shot at best. But as supporters say, stranger things have happened — as recently as Wednesday, in fact. “It’s not going to be easy,” said Derek Hyra, a professor at American University in Washington who specializes in the city’s development and politics. “But I never thought you’d have a group of right-wing people storm the Capitol and be able to get in. I think anything is possible.”

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Boulder Beat

December 12, 2020

"Boulder is doing a lot of things right. Many of the policies Hyra referenced as ways to combat inequality are already in place here: a strong affordable housing program, community benefit requirements for developers, subsidized space for small businesses. But all the beneficial programs in the world mean nothing without an equal and fervent focus on housing, Hyra said. That means not only building units, but making sure people can afford to live in them."



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The New York Times

October 30, 2020

“The situation in 2020 has drawn comparisons to protests in the 1960s, but Derek Hyra, an associate professor in the School of Public Affairs at American University, said recent unrest had been more geographically widespread, affecting a wider swath of businesses. “Most of the rioting and burning in the 1960s happened within the geography of low-income Black spaces,” Mr. Hyra said. “In the 2020 unrest, more of it happened in downtown and affluent areas. “It’s not just urban America,” he added. “The protests have been in the suburbs, they’ve been in rural areas.”

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The Washington Post

October 15, 2020

"In D.C. and its suburbs, the pandemic has fueled a real estate boom as families yearn for more space and younger professionals look to upgrade. Though the rate of millennial workers moving to the metro area was slowing even before the outbreak, its entertainment venues, cultural activities, restaurants, outdoor spaces and public transit tend to attract a highly educated and skilled workforce, despite the high cost of living, said Derek Hyra, a professor at American University and the head of the school’s Metropolitan Policy Center."

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Washington Business Journal

October 15, 2020

"Black businesses got 3% of 7(a) loan dollars in 2019. American University researchers Derek Hyra and Meghan Doughty concluded several factors caused the collapse, including the impact of predatory lending on Black homeowners; smaller loan sizes sought by Black businesses when banks are increasingly lending larger amounts; and a decline in loans in low-income neighborhoods.
Hyra and Doughty made several recommendations, including reducing borrower fees and increasing guarantees. Hyra said the recommendations haven't been adopted. "We had one meeting at the [Obama] White House," Hyra said. "I didn't see any of the recommendations that we made take hold within the SBA. I don't think things have changed much."

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The Mortgage Note

July 21, 2020

Even if there was a mass migration out of cities, an American University professor said it’s likely that a vaccine and an economic recovery would lead to people moving back to the urban areas. “The urban equation has shifted,” said Derek Hyra, a professor in the school’s Department of Public Administration and Policy. “It was mass amenities for small, expensive square footage, and that works for people for a long time. That’s not necessarily the case anymore.”

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Forbes

July 15, 2020

“During the early days of COVID in places like New York City, you saw affluent people going to their second homes, leaving for Long Island. And then there are those people with kids who have to get in an elevator to go to a crowded park, they just want a backyard,” says Derek Hyra, a professor at American University in Washington, D.C., where he focuses on neighborhood change. “Naturally, we question if these people are truly going to leave the city. Once we get a vaccine, will they come back? These are questions that have yet to be answered.”

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iRozhlas

July 5, 2020

"We can certainly say that the unequal treatment of suspects we are witnessing today is partly related to the way African Americans have been treated here for centuries. To justify slavery, the United States had to dehumanize black people, fear them, and say they were not as intelligent as whites, ”Hyra explains.

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The Eagle

July 1, 2020

“These challenges are so complex that they will not likely be solved through any single interdisciplinary lens,” Hyra said. “Nor will, a single inner scope disciplinary lens, be sufficient and enough to understand the complexities of the world. So, to bring together people in sociology, public policy, anthropology, business and communication is really important because people are trained to look at problems in different ways.”

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The Atlantic

June 15, 2020

By all indications, this second group of movers is far larger than those who have abruptly decided to flee. “There was this movement already of people starting to move out of the high-cost cities like San Francisco, New York, and Washington, D.C.,” Derek Hyra, a demographer at American University and the head of the school’s Metropolitan Policy Center, told me. Cities such as Atlanta, Georgia; Austin, Texas; and Nashville, Tennessee have picked up significant population gains because of their relatively affordable real-estate markets, Hyra said, ripe for house flipping and gentrification.

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The Hill

June 1, 2020

"The Trump administration's politics is a politics of divisiveness, it's a politics of scapegoating, and his comments so far related to the civil unrest has only exacerbated and fueled frustrations," said Derek Hyra, a political scientist at American University who is writing a book on race, politics and inequality.